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AGA Top Tips

1. Place a lemon in the Roasting Oven for three minutes before squeezing to extract the most juice. Organic lemons give a far superior flavour and are worth the extra cost.

2. To fry eggs without using a frying pan, use a piece of Bake-O-Glide placed on the Simmering Plate. Crack the egg into the centre of the sheet, and lower the lid to speed up the cooking. It’s fat free and no washing-up.

3. To revive a slightly stale loaf of bread, cut off a slice from the ‘open’ end of the loaf and discard. Hold the loaf, cut-side down, for a few moments under a running cold tap, and then place it in the Roasting Oven for four minutes for warm, crusty bread.

4. When making pancakes, cook the first side in the usual way in a pan on the Boiling Plate, but then flip it over to cook the second side on the lightly greased Simmering Plate. You can then start another pancake in your pan, and double your production speed.

5. Leave jars of jam or syrup for 30 minutes on the back of the top plate of the Aga, with their lids loosened, to soften for easy spreading when baking. Place on a piece of kitchen paper or Bake-O-Glide to protect the enamel.

6. To loosen tight metal screw-top jars, simply place the lid side down on the Simmering Plate for 30 seconds. The metal lid expands and then is easily twisted off using a cloth.

7. Keep a mug of coffee hot whilst chatting on the phone by leaving it on the top plate in front of and between the lids. Place on a piece of kitchen paper or Bake-O-Glide to protect the enamel.

8. For pizzas to die for, cook directly on the floor of the Roasting Oven. Keep the oven floor clean by brushing out with a wire brush.

9. Dry awkward-shaped metal cooking utensils and kitchen gadgets, graters, etc. on the warm top plate – or Warming Plate on four-oven models – so they don’t go rusty in storage.

10. Use the gentle warmth of the top of the Aga to prepare ingredients for cooking. Soften butter, melt chocolate and warm bread flour in the bowl for brilliant bread making.

Taken from The Little Book of AGA Tips by Richard Maggs.